EU Bans Use of Artificial Sweeteners in Dietetic Bakery Products

As a result of the EU’s new rules on dietetic foods, applicable since July 2016, a whole range of products carrying dietetic suitability statements needed to be re-labeled and/or reformulated. In addition, Commission Regulation 2018/97, published on January 23, 2018, bans the use of artificial sweeteners in fine bakery products aimed at people with special dietary needs. It is applied starting February 13, 2018 but products already on the market can be sold until stocks are exhausted.

This came as a result of the EU’s new rules on dietetic foods, applicable since July 2016 and, in addition, Commission Regulation 2018/97, published on January 23, 2018, bans the use of artificial sweeteners in fine bakery products aimed at people with special dietary needs.

It becomes applicable on February 13, 2018 but products already on the market can be sold until stocks are exhausted.

Commission Regulation 2018/97 removes the category “fine bakery products for special nutritional uses” from the food additives regulation, which means that the following sweeteners may no longer be used in bakery products in the EU:

– E 950 Acesulfame K

– E 951 Aspartame

– E 952 Cyclamic acid and its Na and Ca salts

– E 954 Saccharin and its Na, K and Ca salts

– E 955 Sucralose

– E 959 Neohesperidine DC

– E 961 Neotame – E 962 Salt of aspartame-acesulfame

– E 969 Advantame

The EU’s Food for Specific Groups (FSG) regulation 609/2013, adopted in 2013, became applicable in July 2016. It abolished the concept of “dietetic food” by repealing Directive 2009/39, which set out general rules for “food for particular nutritional uses.” In addition, Regulation 2018/97 removes dietetic fine bakery wares from the additives regulation.

The scope of the FSG regulation 609/2013 is limited to infant and follow-on formula, processed cereal-based and other baby food, food for special medical purposes and total diet replacement for weight control. Products no longer falling within the scope of this regulation, such as dietetic fine bakery products, are regarded as regular food and must comply with existing EU legislation on labeling and nutrition and health claims.

Products Affected a Commission report on foods for diabetics, published in 2008, concluded that there are no scientific grounds for developing specific compositional requirements for this category of foods because diabetics can choose a healthy diet from normal foods. This means that food for diabetics are excluded from the scope of the FSG regulation 609/2013.

By removing the category “fine bakery goods for special nutritional uses” from the additives regulation, the use of the aforementioned artificial sweeteners is no longer allowed in any “fine bakery products” including low-calorie and reduced-sugar bakery products. Bakery products with “energy-reduced” or “with no added sugars” claims, must comply with the criteria set out in the EU’s Nutrition and Health Claims regulation 1924/2006.

The new Regulation foresaw that two reports should be prepared by the Commission in order to analyze the need to establish special rules for: young-child formula (the so called “growing-up milks”) and food intended for sportspeople.

You might also like

Newsletter

Subscribe to our FREE NEWSLETTER and stay updated SUBSCRIBE

Privacy Preference Center

Strictly Necessary

These cookies are essential for websites built on Wordpress to perform their basic functions. These include those required to allow registered users to authenticate and perform account related functions.

wordpress_test_cookie, wordpress_{hash}, wordpress_logged_in_{hash}, wp-settings-{user_id}, wp_sharing_{id},gdpr[allowed_cookies],gdpr[consent_types]
_unam, _ga, _gid
OAID
__cfduid

Close your account?

Your account will be closed and all data will be permanently deleted and cannot be recovered. Are you sure?